Embracing the role of motherhood

For 13 years when someone asked what I did for a living I said "I'm a newspaper reporter".  It made me feel like I had accomplished something in life. Four years of college, a degree, and a job in what I went to college for. I was a contributing member of society. I was a public servant, informing the community. I was important, at least in some small way, or so I thought.

Then I burned out on the news and, really, on people. I left newspapers, convinced my love for photography would translate into a successful business. Then I could say "I'm a photographer"

I left the paper for two reasons: to be home with my son and to start a photography business. When the photography business never happened I was left with . . .being a mom because in my mind I wasn't a photographer if I didn't have a business, which, of course, I now know isn't true.

Just a mom.

Just.

A.

Mom.

I couldn't imagine having to answer the question of what I did for a living with "I'm a mom. JUST a mom."

As a kid, I'd never imagined myself a mom. I'd always pictured myself traveling the world as a writer and photojournalist.

My mom was "just a mom" and I had never looked down on her for that so I had no idea why being "just a mom" filled me with a feeling of personal failure.

Why was it bothering me so much to be "just a mom"?

I think the society we live in today, especially in the United States, tells moms that being a mom isn't enough. The idea that being a mom is the best job a woman can have is very popular but only if a person can say "I'm a writer but I'm also a mom and that's the most important job I have."

If a woman can only say "I'm a mom. It's all I do" I believe many look at her as if to say "is that really all you do?"

Last year I sought out a natural doctor for some health issues I've been having. She asked me what I did in my spare time. I started to tell her I was a mom so I don't have much spare tome and she interrupted me "but what do you do for you?" I photograph my children in what I feel is an artistic way and told her but she shook her head in disapproval and I immediately felt that shame at being "just a mom". Here was another woman, maybe even a mother herself, reminding me that I needed to be more than a mom. I needed to do something more with my life. I couldn't just be a mom.

Other women shame each other into believing they need to be more than a mom but I don't believe God desires there to be any shame felt when a woman's sole job, so to speak, is "just being a mom."

I'm working on accepting this title of mom, which I know sounds weird since I've been one for almost a decade.

I'm practicing saying "I'm a mom," and not needing to add after it "And I am also a photographer."

For me, photography isn't a job, and I don't want it to be. It's part of who I am in the same way being "just a mom" is part of who I am and who I always will be.
 

Lisa Robinson-Howeler

Lisa Howeler Photographer, Athens, PA

I'm a wife, mom, writer and photographer from Northeastern Pennsylvania. I'm a former journalist, which is what my degree is in, and enjoy the freedom of being able to create as a mainly self-taught photographer.