Faithfully thinking: Don't base your value on the fake world of photography

Photography today is creating what isn't real. It's manipulation of you, the viewer. That beautiful scene with that family in an open field with amazing sun?

Nine times out of ten that's not real. It was edited in Photoshop.

The power lines were painted out, the sun flare was added with an overlay and that kid who photo bombed the whole thing was quickly and quietly dispatched with the gesture of the mouse and click of a few keyboard commands like the photographer mafia.

That little girl sitting on a box, in a perfect white room, no clutter, no mess, no toys scattered around her, enjoying the wind of the fan blowing in her face?

Also fake.

The toys were pushed to one side, or brushed away via editing software.

Fake.

Fake.

Fake.

And more fake.

Much of what you see in the photography world is fake.

It is airbrushed.

It is whitewashed.

It is cloned out and over.

It's made to look pretty because people like pretty.

lisa r. howeler copyright

 

People like fake.

People like fake so they don't have to face reality.

The problem is that even when a person knows it's fake they tell themselves it's real.

They compare and contrast their life with the fake.

Their house isn't that clean.

Their kids aren't that well dressed.

Their walls aren't that white.

Their sink isn't that clean.

The pictures in their frames aren't that professional.

Their life isn't that perfect.

Newsflash: no one else's is either.

They just don't want you to know.

I found myself awake too early after a long night helping my oldest with a stuffy nose and watering eyes, caught up in the popularity game of social media. Because that's what it is - a game. An attempt to fit in with the popular kids, to be in the "in crowd".

I was playing the game hard.

And I was losing. Hard.

I didn't have as many likes, as many followers, as many comments.

Maybe I was posting at the wrong time.

Maybe I needed to network more.

Maybe I needed to edit differently.

Maybe I needed to kiss some more virtual butt.

To me the lack of likes and comments was equating to not being good enough, not being talented enough, not being important enough, just not being enough.

Because I don't feel good enough as a mom and a home keeper (seriously, God, are you sure this is where you want me? I am horrible at keeping a house clean!)

I have found myself second guessing all my photography, my edits, thinking constantly abit how others edit and that If I don't shoot or edit the way they do then I won't fit in, I won't sell with stock photography, I won't measure up.

I really wish more people would stop trying to make themselves look enough.

That I would stop trying to make myself look and feel enough.

God says I am enough but because I stare at a phone or computer screen too much I don't hear him.

I can't hear him over the shouts of "Keep up! Keep up!!" In my head.

The demands to make my house look like her house.

To dress my children the way she does.

To edit photos like he does.

To write like her.

Cook like her.

Look like her.

Pray like her.

Trust God like them.

Hear God speaking to me daily like him.

Know God's purpose for my life like her.

To speak positivity and prosperity over my life and have it all change in two weeks like the lady on that podcast.

Over and over and over those thoughts spin in my head.

There is only one way to silence them: recognize you are NOT THEM.

God has a unique plan for each of us.

Each plan is unique because each person is unique.

Stop playing the game.

Stop comparing.

Stop trying to be what you see in the pictures.

And by you I mean "me too."

 

See beyond the shine and know that there is dirt.

You can't see the mother crying just outside the frame, worrying she dressed her children "wrong" and her photos won't look as nice as her sister-in-law or cousins or friend's photos.

You can't see the dad feeling inadequate because he works 50 hours a week but is still deep in debt.

You can't see the toddler who threw a tantrum; the teenager who feels less than and rejected; the grandparents who only see their grandchildren in photographs because their daughter has been angry at them for years for things they apologized for over and over.

But really?

You can see all of that.

You can see all of it.

Because when you look at that pretty photograph, know that in it are real people in a fake scene.

Real people who struggle, who hurt, who cry, who suffer, who want to be loved and who are loved by the same God who loves you

Lisa Robinson-Howeler

Lisa Howeler Photographer, Athens, PA

I'm a wife, mom, writer and photographer from Northeastern Pennsylvania. I'm a former journalist, which is what my degree is in, and enjoy the freedom of being able to create as a mainly self-taught photographer.